Time Inc. and Hearst Corporation Support CBFA Plan to Safeguard Boreal Woodland

Time Inc. and Hearst Corporation Support CBFA Plan to Safeguard Boreal Woodland

MAY 2014

A Statement by Time Inc. and Hearst Corporation in Support of the Canadian Boreal Forest Agreement (CBFA) Secretariat’s Call Upon Ontario New Democratic Party Leader Andrea Horwath, Ontario Conservative Party Leader Tim Hudak, Green Party of Ontario Leader Mike Schreiner and Ontario Liberal Party Leader Kathleen Wynne to Implement the CBFA Plan to Safeguard Boreal Woodland Caribou and Preserve Jobs in Northeast Ontario

Time Inc. and Hearst Enterprises are calling on the four Ontario political party leaders to commit to implement the Canadian Boreal Forest Agreement’s (CBFA) plan to safeguard boreal woodland caribou habitat and maintain hundreds of forestry-related jobs in three million hectares in Northeastern Ontario.

By committing to implement this plan, the next Premier of Ontario is recognizing an important collaborative model for industry, environmental groups, First Nations and communities to work together for the economic and environmental betterment of the province.

As members of the CBFA Boreal Business Forum, we are keen to see continued progress through the implementation of the CBFA across Canada.

We agree with the CBFA Secretariat that the implementation of this plan is in the interests of all Ontarians now and for future generations.

Guy Gleysteen
Senior Vice President, Production
Time Inc.

David A. Schirmer
Vice President and General Manager
Hearst Enterprises
About Time Inc. (www.timeinc.com)

Time Inc., a division of Time Warner, is one of the largest branded media companies in the world. The company’s magazines reach more than 110 million Americans each month, and its websites attract nearly 50 million unique visitors each month. With influential brands such as Time, People, Sports Illustrated, InStyle and Real Simple, Time Inc. is home to celebrated events and franchises including the Fortune 500 and Time 100.

About Hearst (www.hearst.com)

Hearst is one of the largest diversified communications companies in the world. Its major interests include 15 daily and 36 weekly newspapers and more than 300 magazines worldwide, including Harper’s Bazaar, Cosmopolitan, Esquire, Elle, and O, The Oprah Magazine; 29 television stations through Hearst Television, Inc., which reach a combined 18% of U.S. viewers; ownership in leading cable networks, including A+E Networks, and ESPN Inc.; as well as business publishing, digital distribution, television production, newspaper features distribution, and real estate ventures.

Earth Rangers Support CBFA Plan to Safeguard Boreal Woodland

Earth Rangers Support CBFA Plan to Safeguard Boreal Woodland

MAY 2014

OPEN LETTER TO:

Ontario Conservative Party Leader Tim Hudak, Ontario New Democratic Party Leader Andrea Horwath, Ontario Liberal Party Leader Kathleen Wynne and Green Party of Ontario Leader Mike Schreiner to Implement the Canadian Boreal Forest Agreement Plan to Safeguard Caribou and Preserve Jobs in Northeast Ontario

As Executive Director of Earth Rangers, I would like to support the Canadian Boreal Forest Agreement (CBFA) Secretariat’s request of the leaders of all four political parties to publicly commit to implementing the CBFA’s plan to safeguard boreal woodland caribou habitat and maintain hundreds of forestry-related jobs on the Abitibi River Forest in Northeastern Ontario.

This innovative solution, put forward by the CBFA signatories and supported by other key stakeholders, has already undergone review by the Ontario Minister of Natural Resources that concluded in April 2014 with a recommendation for the government to implement it.

The current election has put implementation on hold, but we believe the urgent economic and environmental benefits of implementing this plan transcend partisan politics.

To that end, I am encouraging the leaders of all four major Ontario political parties to show leadership, by joining with forestry companies, conservation groups, First Nations and municipalities to implement a plan that preserves jobs and strengthens communities in Northeastern Ontario, while protecting forest ecosystems and natural habitat – a plan that is in the interest of all Ontarians, now and for future generations.

Sincerely,

Peter Kendall
Executive Director
Earth Rangers

Statement by Thomas Nepinak, West Region Tribal Council, Treaty 4 Member

Statement by Thomas Nepinak, West Region Tribal Council, Treaty 4 Member

FEBRUARY 2014

Thomas Nepinak, West Region Tribal Council, Treaty 4 Member, CBFA Manitoba Working Group

As a First Nation person, who has recognized the importance of forests at an early age, I applaud the Canadian Boreal Forest Agreement as an important initiative launched in 2010.  In my view, this should have been introduced many years ago.

It is a success story for all of Canada for the CBFA is the world’s largest conservation initiative. I would hand over a gold platinum award to the CBFA for giving all Canadians the responsibility to help define and realize what the future of our forests should look like. It is a benchmark that protects the most important carbon storehouse on this planet.

Another success is that the CBFA recognizes the rights of all Aboriginal peoples and does not intend in any way to usurp Aboriginal peoples’ efforts to resolve outstanding rights and title issues. In addition to this, it does not resolve, or attempt to resolve, any outstanding issues that First Nations may have with forestry companies, always bearing in mind that 80 per cent of Canada is covered by Indian Treaties.

Another trademark of the CBFA is that it has identified 30 million hectares as off limits to road building, logging and other forestry activities and operations. This is highly endorsed by many First Nations, as many Aboriginals are keepers of the land.

To date, more and more First Nations are now on board with the CBFA and they are providing input into what should be accommodating to their way of life and ecosystem of the Boreal Forest.

I have to attest, without being biased, the Manitoba Regional Working Group has forged ahead with the CBFA with due-diligence and it has done excellent work towards wrangling the pros and cons of the CBFA’s visions and goals.

As a Regional Working Group, our work has always been based on the importance of the future health of the forests that are sustainable, relying on the recommendations of leading sustainable resource management practices.

At the same time, we are accommodating the harvest needs of the timber industry. However, we are also making sure that they don’t leave a large footprint on the land.

To the say least, the biggest challenge to realizing the CBFA’s visions and goals is the communication process to Aboriginal leaders and communities.

The reason being is that the majority of First Nation leaders are so engulfed and incapacitated in community affairs, disparities and with government bureaucracy that there is very little time available for the CBFA.

Before such initiatives go to the community, proper protocol must be followed. A Band Council Resolution (BCR) is often required. Sometimes it takes time for a BCR to be written up and implemented. Also, many times a promising initiative abruptly stops if a new government is elected, which transpires every two years. Politics can sometimes cause initiatives to gather dust.

Many young Aboriginal people don’t recognize the forests like our forefathers and it is difficult to open their eyes to how important the forests are to mankind and all living things.

Last, but not least, we are fast losing many Aboriginal Elders in our communities that possess Traditional Knowledge of the land.  As a result, it is going to be very difficult to incorporate Traditional Ecological Knowledge into the CBFA. We will capture some, but not all.

Statement by Mika Carriere, Projects Office, Prince Albert Model Forest

Statement by Mika Carriere, Projects Office, Prince Albert Model Forest

FEBRUARY 2014

Mika Carriere, Projects Officer, Prince Albert Model Forest, CBFA Saskatchewan Working Group

The Prince Albert Model Forest believes in the Cree saying ‘Ma mah wechetowin’ which means ‘Working together and helping each other’. Through the CBFA along with the Saskatchewan Regional Working Group we have opened the doors for three Aboriginal communities: Cumberland House, Red Earth First Nation and Shoal Lake Cree Nation to share their stories through Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) about Woodland caribou in an effort to work together to help protect the species at risk.

Training local youth to reach out and interview Elders within each community has been the biggest success in collecting TEK. Collectively the voices of our Aboriginal participants relate to the environment as a whole – seeing that all living things are connected. Overall they have helped identify Woodland caribou habitat in regards to the CBFA but on a greater scale their statements reflect on the cultural lifestyle impacts in regards to hunting, fishing and trapping. Our Aboriginal participants play a major role in advising the CBFA about important land-based impacts within the Pasquia-Porcupine FMA.

Statement by Gregory Jeddore, Forestry Manager, Miawpukek First Nation

Statement by Gregory Jeddore, Forestry Manager, Miawpukek First Nation

FEBRUARY 2014

Gregory Jeddore, Forestry Manager, Miawpukek First Nation, CBFA Newfoundland Working Group

As a part of the CBFA working group, the Miawpukek First Nation have an opportunity to have a say and to educate the non-aboriginal communities and commercial operators in the importance of the forest and the land to the Aboriginal people in Newfoundland. As Aboriginal people we hold a close tie to the land and the forest that the Great Spirit has placed upon us; we used the forest and the land as a part of our daily lives for trapping, hunting, shelter, tools, canoes, gathering areas and burial grounds.

As members of the CBFA it gives us the chance to speak about these places that hold a lot off interest to the Mi’kmaq people in Newfoundland. The CFBA has given the opportunity to the Miawpukek First Nation Mi’kmaq people to speak their concerns to the CBFA on trying to find a solution to protecting their territories that hold a great deal of history and culture.

MFN endorses CBFA for their strong support in helping Indigenous people across Canada in having a say in what activities can take place on their traditional territories. For that we thank you – wela’lin.

Statement by Dr. Fiona Schmiegelow, University of Alberta

Statement of Support for the Canadian Boreal Forest Agreement (CBFA)

October 2013

Dr. Fiona Schmiegelow, Professor of Northern Environmental and Conservation Sciences at the University of Alberta and Senior Science Advisor to the CBFA

The Canadian Boreal Forest Agreement presents an incredible opportunity for the forest industry and the conservation community to jointly and collaboratively apply leading-edge science to real, on-the-ground environmental, economic and social challenges.

It also provides a model to evaluate and improve that science. The collaborative and transparent approach to decision-making in the CBFA allows for meaningful incorporation of the best available information, and an adaptive process that is flexible to new or improved information.

Boreal forests are major contributors to environmental, economic and social values across Canada, and play a critical role nationally and internationally in addressing climate change.

Canada has an opportunity to be a global leader in the science and practice of true sustainability, and the CBFA is an important and innovative approach to realizing that potential.

Statement by Jeffery Thomas, Councilor, Chemawawin Cree Nation, Winnipeg

Statement by Jeffery Thomas, Councilor, Chemawawin Cree Nation, Winnipeg

JUNE 2013

Jeffery Thomas, Councilor, Chemawawin Cree Nation, Winnipeg, CBFA Manitoba Working Group

I fully endorse the Canadian Boreal Forest Agreement (CBFA) and the inclusive progress it has adopted to ensure that First Nations are fully involved in building an environmentally and economically sustainable future for Canada.

As a representative of the Chemawawin Cree Nation and a member of the CBFA’s regional working group in Manitoba, I play a leadership role in ensuring that our community’s perspectives and input on matters of conservation and economic prosperity are reflected in any action taken under the Agreement.

It is our objective that affected and interested communities are kept informed of the CBFA’s progress and have the opportunity to participate, should they so choose.

The CBFA is a great opportunity for everyone with rights or a stake in the landscape to sit at the same table and work together to protect the Boreal Forest, the wildlife that lives within and the communities that depend on the forest for their livelihood.